Huevos Motuleños – in Motul

Is there someone out there who hasn’t realized that Huevos Motuleños are named after the town of Motul; birthplace of Felipe Carrillo Puerto, one of the more renowned governors of the state of Yucatan? Perhaps. The town of Motul actually got its name from the Mayan priest  Zac Mutul, who founded the Mayan settlement there in the 11th century.  But today we are not going to talk about history; we are talking about the eggs. Huevos Motuleños, which has a back story, apparently.

The story, as far I can decipher, is that Felipe Carrillo Puerto asked local restaurateur Jorge Siqueff to make him something for breakfast; something different. And this now iconic Yucatecan dish, served everywhere Yucatecan food is offered (and with as many variations as there are Yucatecan restaurants) is what he came up with.  The version in Motul is probably the closest to the original, and starts with crunchy fried corn tortillas or tostadas, topped with refried black beans, topped with your choice of eggs (sunny side up, runny, scrambled) topped with a unique cooked tomato sauce that has chunks of (should be smoked) ham and peas.

Check out some video (in Spanish) on the subject of this unique breakfast item here and here:

This is how the Critic and his guests had this breakfast one morning a few days ago on the second floor of the Motul market and it is absolutely delicious!

The lady in the Mirador spot (photo below) was very friendly and offered free refills on the horchatas; and as if the eggs were not enough, warm frances (crusty french-style white bread) was brought to the table as well.

Total bill for a breakfast that will keep you energized for the whole day? $40 pesos before tips. That’s a little over 3 dollars, for those doing conversions.

3 thoughts on “Huevos Motuleños – in Motul

  1. That is not the story of origination that I have been told. I was told in the market in Motul that the dish came about when Carrillo Puerto was giving a speech to some campesinos. He was a champion of indigenous rights and land reform. The story goes that he was also providing food to these people for coming to his speeches but the supplies were running low. His cooks infromed him that all that was left were the iconic ingredients used to make the plate today: peas, jam, eggs, tortillas, tomato salsa. He told them to throw them all together and tell the people that the dish was called huevos motuleños (after his hometown).

    I`ve never seen this story documented in any reliable source but it is the story that I have heard consistently living in Merida Yucatan for the last year.

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